Frontiers of Entrepreneurship Research
1996 Edition


ALCOHOLISM TREATMENT CENTER DEATH: INTERORGANIZATIONAL LINKAGES IN HEALTH CARE*

Terry C. Blum, Georgia Institute of Technology

Paul M. Roman, University of Georgia

Scott A. Shane, Massachusetts Institute of Technology


Menu
Introduction
The Alcoholism Treatment Industry
Hypotheses
Methodology
Results
Discussion
Conclusion
References


ABSTRACT

While organizations increasingly rely on linkages to other firms, the value of this strategy is open to question. This study examines the effects of interorganizational linkages on the survival of 124 private for-profit and not-for-profit alcoholism treatment centers in the United States between 1989 and 1994, a particularly turbulent time period for the health care industry. Data show that organizational survival is adversely affected by linkages if: (1) they reduce organizational autonomy; (2) they allow organizational stakeholders to impose costly and conflicting demands on organizations: and (3) they are not munificent.

*The authors would like to acknowledge support during the preparation of this manuscript from: The DuPree Center for Entrepreneurship and New Venture Development, Georgia Tech; Grant R01-AA-10130 from the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism; and Grant R01-DA-07417 from the National Institute on Drug Abuse. Comments on previous versions of this paper from Dan Cable and Ferd Levy are also gratefully acknowledged.

Next Page

 

 

1997 Babson College All Rights Reserved
Last Updated 1/15/97 by Geoff Goldman & Dennis Valencia

To sign-up for the Center for Entrepreneurial Studies' publication lists,
please register with the
Entrepreneurship WebTeam.