Frontiers of Entrepreneurship Research
1997 Edition

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BENEFITS OF TECHNOLOGY BASED STRATEGIC ALLIANCES: AN ENTREPRENEURIAL PERSPECTIVE

G. Dale Meyer, University of Colorado Boulder
Sharon A. Alvarez, University of Colorado Boulder
Jim Blasick, University of Colorado Boulder


INTRODUCTION
LITERATURE REVIEW & RELATED HYPOTHESES

Trust and Alliances
TABLE 1:  Benefits of Cooperation Between Two Similar Firms In An Alliance*
Resource–Based Theory and Alliances
TABLE 2:  Contributions to Resource–based Theory From Other Perspectives*
TABLE 3:  Benefits of Cooperation Between Two Firms In An Alliance With Separate, Distinct, and Complementary Knowledge Resources*
Knowledge in entrepreneurial firms

METHODOLOGY
    The Sample
    Data Collection
    Analysis
RESULTS
    TABLE 4:  Factor Analysis Results
 DISCUSSION
    TABLE 5:  Multiple Regression Analysis of Performance Outcome Variables
    FIGURE ONE:  Relationship Between Trust, Resources, and Alliance Success.
REFERENCES

ABSTRACT

How can successful alliances be formed to make the entrepreneurial small venture survive, succeed, and grow?  To answer this question, we interviewed and sent questionnaires to executives in the biotechnology industry, which has extensive experience in and a broad understanding of alliances.  Our results indicate that mutual trust and cooperation, and the sharing of complementary resource sets, are significant predictors of both the success of the alliance and of the entrepreneurial firm.  Specific measures of success included enhanced competitive position, greater and more efficient access to markets, reduced risk, and overall success for the small firm.  Success of the alliance was also predicted.

 

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